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Thursday, January 9, 2020

Pound Cake: Soda Fountain Back Bar

Mired in the ever present Chicken or Egg debate, this week I decided to focus on making the "built in" foundation pieces that will line the walls of the bakery. It seemed like a good plan to have the pieces finished and installed (or at least ready) prior to attempting to install the ceiling. This would eliminate the need for reaching in up to 18" and trying to read a ruler in the dark recesses. Being a pretty straight forward, stand alone piece, I began with the soda fountain back bar. It was a good piece with which to wet my feet as it is only slightly more complicated than any prior cabinets I've designed for the Cricut to cut.


The bakery's ice cream counter section will be at the back of the store when looking through the front doors. I really wanted to incorporate an old fashioned soda fountain back bar to fit the area from the left open wall to the stairway. I gathered the measurements for that space, then began to create all of the pieces to make up the unit, essentially creating a furniture kit for it in Design Space. Initially, I used 5 pieces of chipboard to make it. Material cost: $5.40.

The entire thing is made up using square shapes that have been resized to make up the components needed. For the decorative stepped arches, I imported a cornice drawing and then created a reverse pattern to use to slice out the decorative shelf openings.




This photo shows how well the knife blade actually cuts the 2mm chipboard.


Here are the pieces of the upper unit laid out. I ended up re-cutting a new back frame for the mirror to add more support and to mimic the front piece's decorative arches. I also eliminated the solid backer piece since the unit will be attached to the wall. This reduced the pieces of chipboard down to 4, making the cost for the unit material actually $4.32.


This is how the upper shelf unit looks after gluing the "kit" pieces together. I left the top area above the decorative arches wide so that I could add crown molding and "carved" molding later.


The lower cabinets are a separate unit designed in the same manner. They are standard counter height at 36" in real life or 3" (including countertop height) in 1/12th scale. The upper unit will sit right on top.


The design is basically a rectangle box with decorative wainscot panel. It mimics the upper unit's shelf openings and is simply glued to the front.


Glued together and with added embellishments.


I added molding and support trim behind it to give the countertop a "bullnose" edge. It's my attempt to make a 2mm thick piece of chipboard look like a solid slab of honed marble.


Here is the entire unit with added crown molding and embellishments. Once I install the kit's left frame wall to create the corner (the left frame wall is only about 1-1/2" wide), I may cut the crown molding flush to the left side of the unit for a tight fit to that corner. I did not account for the extra 5/8" that the crown molding would take away from the space to enter the stairway. I'll have a better idea if it looks too tight there once I finish the front counter section.


I gave the countertop a faux marble finish and then painted the rest of the unit Licorice. Once it was dry I attached the mirror sheet to the back. It is really difficult to get good photos of black painted furniture - especially against a white counter. The camera just doesn't know how to compensate. I took several photos using different lighting and adjustments so you could see each of the details in it's best light. I also tried a number of tricks so that you would not have to look at my reflection in the mirrored back of the piece.




For lighting the center and upper shelves, I am using 12v bulb and sockets. I have had the little white plastic support pieces in my stash for a number of years. They came with LED bulbs from China. I like to utilize them, with a little trimming, to act as socket holders for the bulb/socket assembly. Once they are gone, I will have to come up with a different option.
Keep in mind that the bulbs will be much brighter when connected to a transformer with electricity rather than the 9 volt battery I have used for demonstration. Pictures are worth a thousand words...











Here is where it will be placed in the shop, next to the stairs. The soda shop counter and glass ice cream freezer will be placed in front of it. Do you see where gaining another 5/8" for the stair opening might make a difference?
I am super excited and looking forward to filling the shelves with wonderful old time details!



This week I hope to start designing and cutting the pieces for the bakery goods shelving. The angle of the stairs is going to make for some tricky math and measurements. I hope I have learned my lesson with the soda shop back bar and will account for the molding and trim in these pieces! I will keep at it, though, until I figure it all out!


Have a great week that, hopefully, includes time to play!

xo xo,
Jodi

52 comments:

  1. The is real piece of art. I've never worked with chip board, nor have I decided to buy the Maker. I looked at one today. You have a great tutorial here and the project is beautiful. So exciting to watch you work.

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    1. Thanks Ann! I have heard that the outlets that sell the Maker have Saturday classes that you can sign up for to see if you'll enjoy using one before you buy them. I have not checked into this myself but it might be just the thing to help you decide!

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  2. ¡Impresionante! te ha quedado un mueble perfecto y el tutorial fantástico ; lo haces de forma que entran ganas de ponerse hacerlo.Feliz fin de semana,besos:-)

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    1. Gracias Rosa Maria! ¡Estoy tan feliz de que te haya gustado la pieza y que hayas disfrutado viendo cómo surgió! ¡Se siente tan poderoso tener una herramienta así!

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  3. Has hecho un precioso trabajo con el mueble. Un gran diseño y una estupenda ejecución.

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    1. Gracias isabel Es difícil administrar todas las cosas que debe recordar, como restar el grosor del material en algunas de las piezas interiores, pero si hay bastante tiempo para concentrarse, ¡puede hacerlo!

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  4. Thank you, thank you, thank you for showing how you are using your Cricket! I love how, with just a little bit of curved detail and some embellishments, you were able to create a piece worthy of fine furniture.

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    1. Thank you Sherrill! Thank goodness for places like Ikea that show us how flat pack furniture can be made! It's exactly the same with making it with the Cricut, minus all the hardware, lol!

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  5. Ah, yes.... the thickness of trims! We do tend to forget how much they stick out! But all is not lost... you could gain visual and actual space by cutting back the solid stair wall at the bottom of the stairs, making it end at the front of the second step... the first step being thus "open" on both the front and side, like a corner step... you could even make the stair rail terminate with a lamp post at that second to last step... to better light the stairway.... I don't think I am describing it very well...! But I am sure you will come up with a solution! Stairs in older buildings were not made to standard specs... so they often had strange twists and turns! And a cabinet that would be against the "fourth wall" would not have the trim go around to the sides... so you could keep it on the front but not the sides. I am as impressed as the others by your cutting program! You are a great teacher! I am loving seeing this shop project going full steam ahead!!! :):)

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    1. Oh Betsy cutting back the wall to expose the first stair is such ab excellent idea! Thank you, thank you! And I think it will add even more charm to a shop in an era where quirky features were ever present!
      I am so glad you're here with me and I appreciate your encouraging feedback!

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  6. My goodness Jodi, you have some wicked good design skills. I love the soda bar. I got a Maker for Christmas and need to watch some more videos. I have no clue, but seeing this has given me some hope.

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    1. Thanks Carrie! Where there's a will there is a way!!!
      Think of the flat pack furniture from places like Ikea. That's all there is to designing your own pieces. And the willingness to try, try, try again!

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  7. Fantabulous! I'm thirsty and hungry just looking at it.

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    1. Me too, Megan! When it comes time to actually make all the food stuffs, I am going to have to learn fast and well!!

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  8. A beautiful creation using the Cricut Maker...I have the Cricut Air 2 but it can't handle chipboard. Very impressed with the design you created and how the Maker cut the material you selected...will need to add this tool to my wish list! Cheers, Alayne

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    1. Thank you Alayne! I started off with the Explore Air which is just a machine before your Air 2. Using the deep cut blade and 2mm chipboard purchased from Joann's, I was able to cut the cabinets for the Storybook kitchen and Autumn's Pantry. Set the material to thick cardboard and the blade to extra pressure, I think it was 320 psi. Only have it do one pass to keep the cuts perfect. When it is finished, you will have to pass the xacto blade through the material carefully and several times, but at least you'll have perfectly measured and detailed pieces. It will be good design practice for when you get the Maker. You can do it!!!

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  9. formidable! gracias por el despiece...

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  10. Wow what a professional design always I see something what inspire me, great all your pictures of the new cupboard!
    have a nice day,
    groetjes van Marijke

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    1. Thank you Marijke! I always come away from your blog inspired, as well!

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  11. Very beautiful! I really like the design, decorations and color. The marble is perfect.

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    1. Thank you Faby! I am so happy that you like the piece and the marble!

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  12. Awesome! You are making the furniture yourself and give it a personal touch which is why your work is so special. I love the black and white. It's going to be a very elegant bakery.
    Hugs,
    Drora

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    1. Thank you Drora! It is a great feeling to be able to make custom pieces for odd spaces and to learn how things fit together! The cost savings is a really nice experience, too!

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  13. Great job and great photos! Its very inspiring. Thanks for the tutorial and "behind the scenes" look at how this came together. It is going to be a great project. I really enjoy the color palette too. Looking forward to watching your progress. Keep up the good work!

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    1. Thanks Troy! Learning this tool is an exciting challenge and I hope to learn and share so much more! Inspiring and empowering others is a privilege, too, and it's so great to hear the positive feedback!

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  14. My Goodness Jodi! There's NOTHING that you can't do AND do PERFECTLY! I'm Loving your shelf unit and I would never have guessed in a million years that you'd constructed it from cardstock: it's GORGEOUS!

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    1. Thank you Elizabeth! These early pieces are pretty simply designed but I hope to keep adding to my knowledge so that I can keep improving. The process is so much fun and so far very rewarding!

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  15. Thank you so much, Jodi, for showing us how you're working with the Cricut Maker and how you designs your furniture at this machine. The result is awesome! I love the black and white, hereby it will be a very elegant shop!
    Hugs, Ilona

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    1. Thank you Ilona! Just having precisely cut pieces feels like such a victory! And ending up with sturdy furniture you made yourself feels great! I am so happy to hear that folks are learning along with me!

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  16. Un comienzo espléndido.
    Me gusta mucho todo lo hecho hasta ahora.

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    1. Gracias a Eloisa! ¡Espero tener espacio en la tienda para todas las ideas que quiero probar!

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  17. wow, just wow...I love it and thank you for the great tutorial

    Hugs
    Marisa

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    1. Thank you Marisa! I am happy that you enjoyed the process with me!

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  18. Dear Jodi, you are making the most of the Cricut maker, that´s for sure. Designing your own furniture is genius, you make it look easy but I´m sure is not! I love your design and the result, can´t wait to see what comes next!

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    1. Thank you, Alex! I am really enjoying discovering all of the things that machine can do! When the house is quiet, it really helps me to concentrate on where to add and where to subtract for joining pieces. When Russ is home, I have learned to avoid doing anything complicated, lol! Husbands!

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  19. What a wonderful post! ;O) I'm really in awe with your soda bar - nobody seeing it without the information we have would ever guess that it is totally made and designed by you and that it is cardboard. It looks stunning and your black and white color concept gives everything a very elegant look. I suppose it will be the perfect "frame" once the colorful candy stuff settles in.

    Thanks for another very well explained and shown "how to"... It somehow causes an itching in my fingers… but luckily this stops as soon as I'm looking at prices of plotters here in Germany. *LOL* Have fun with the new shelves for the baked goods!

    Hugs
    Birgit

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    1. Thanks Birgit! We'll keep the cardboard part secret okay? 😜
      I know! The prices of things! Here we have sales periodically, and I was able to take advantage of a "Trade In" sale stacked with a percentage discount and free shipping. It was enough to push me over the edge, especially once I'd labeled it a "Birthday Present". I was going to offset the cost even more by listing the older model I have for sale on Craig's List, but I have not been able to find the box! I know I put it in a "safe place" when we did the upstairs remodeling the summer of '18, but it is hiding in a place I have not discovered yet!

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  20. I'm always amazed by the beauty of your cabinetry. It's not just how precisely things are cut, but how wonderfully they are embellished. You always find exactly the right little bits and pieces to take your cabinetry to the artisan level. I like your lighting, too. I can definitely see how just a little more space would give more room for the staircase; isn't it good to make things and try them out before you get too far in a build? And finally--a soda fountain!! Yes!!!!! 😊

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    1. Thanks Deb! What a lovely complement! It is wonderful to see how just a little bit of Dresden can add so much to simple chipboard! And it takes the paint so well, too!
      I have hacked at the staircase, opening up the area by removing the lower wall. Now I have to live with it for a while until a final resolution hits me. I may even end up extending the landing and creating a return 180 degrees. We'll see. But yes - nothing will get permanently fixed in place until I am sure!

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  21. Preciosa estantería.
    Un gran tutorial y el resultado fantástico.
    Un saludo

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    1. Gracias por los encantadores comentarios Marian!

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  22. Love the black cabinetry!
    Mini huggs,
    Conny

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  23. Gracias por el tutorial.
    Se ve fantástica en negro, me encanta.
    Carolina

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  24. The beautiful cupboard is perfect with light

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    1. Thank you Gonda! You never know until much later in the project if there will be enough light!

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  25. I envy you (not in a bad way) the machine and ability to use it so beautifully. Most of all I think I always love the fabulous finishing touches that you add to things to just raise them to another level: the wonderful marble finish and all the little embellishments that are just the right size and just the right amount and look as though they absolutely need to be there. Fantabulous work as always. Such a joy to share in it.

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    1. It is such a blessing to have the Maker and to get the opportunity to learn and play with it's possibilities. I am sure there are much better and useful ways to harness the power for minis and as I discover them I will certainly share! I am also grateful to have a supply of trims and embellishments to call upon! I'm glad you like where they're leading the bakery!

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  26. Wow! I'm late commenting but I'm so glad I didn't miss your post entirely. You're making me give serious consideration to buying a Cricut.

    I love how the shelves and cabinets turned out. The lights at the top are the perfect touch.

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