Thursday, August 8, 2019

Autumn's Pantry: Structure & Lighting

Once again, I didn't intend to create such a long post! But fair warning: what follows is the chronicle of a full and productive mini week nonetheless! I'll start with a photo of the end in case you have better things to do!


I began by cutting the Lexan (polycarbonate) for all seven of the windows, as well as the shop's top. You see, Carlson kits do not come with acetate (except for the door). I have used this material in the past and just love the 1/16" thickness and the ease in cutting it, provided you have the scoring tool. It takes me about 44 passes with the scoring tool, and then I can snap at the score line and finish off the last couple passes with my Xacto knife.



Here I am testing the fit. In this type of window, a pretty perfect fit is the best outcome. The second photo shows me sanding down the really snug areas.



All cut!


Now for the trim. I used 1/8" x 1/16" basswood, painted on all sides. I created a frame around the outside of the windows and affixed them with regular Tacky Glue. Tacky Glue isn't always reliable on acetate, but on Lexan, it attaches securely.



Next I installed the windows using wood glue (because of it's runny constancy) as caulking where the frames met. I have a small glue applicator bottle with a 1/32" tip. This allows me to apply a bead of glue to the seam, then run my finger along to smooth and remove excess just as you do when caulking a real life sink. Once the exterior was dry, I cut and installed the interior trim pieces in the same manner. A coat of careful painting did the rest.





I was really looking forward to the next step - making the stained glass windows for the small upper windows on the front of the shop. Once I had sample pieces taped in place, though, I didn't like them! They only served to block one of my favorite features looking in through the front - the arched upper shelves! Because I was so prepared (bought supplies) and so excited about doing them, I did go ahead and play with some techniques. I will share all of that in a later post.


Now, with that decision behind me, it was time to regroup. I turned my attention to finishing up the structural elements. I made up and installed the wall that attaches the bay window section to the main section. This is just two pieces, wall and header, of 1/8" basswood sheet ripped down to size then glued in.


I kept thinking that in a completely enclosed project like this, the windows had to look really interesting from the outside. This niggled at me for a couple days and then I realized: I needed a shelf to create window displays in the bay! So, I traced the dimensions onto some more 1/8" basswood sheet and cut out an inch wide  shelf. I attached 1/8" x 1/8" basswood strips to recess into the window wells so there wouldn't be any gap.







From the outside
I really wanted the front door to actually function in this build, so I got out my hinges and said some prayers. The stars were smiling on me, and I've never had an easier or more successful time installing hinges! Can you guess what the first entry in my gratitude journal was that day? :O) In a later photo you'll get to see it opened. I just can't stop testing (playing with) it!


The next task was not as friendly. You see, I wanted the windows to have awnings, but I wasn't really sure how to make them. I Googled but couldn't find an actual awning pattern. I settled for some patterns that had the scalloped edging, then used my PC to edit them a bit. Then I imported the best image into the Cricut Design Space and made not only the awnings, but the valences for the interior of the shop, too. It took me four tries, six sheets of nice scrapbook paper and a new blade to get them right. I used a polka dot pattern for the interior/underside and a striped paper for the exposed side. I left them on the sticky mat to help hold them in place while I Mod Podged the two sides together. Once dry, I applied the Mod Podge to each of the sides, letting them dry in between.




I wanted to see if something really simple would work, and it did! In design space, I took the original scalloped edge image and welded a rectangle to the back. For those that have no idea about Cricut terms, I'll just leave it that I adjusted the size so that there would be a .75 inch scallop, a 1.25 inch awning, and a .25 inch strip to adhere to the structure. I made each awning fit the windows with a .25 inch overhang on each side. I used basswood strips in matching sizes to help me fold them evenly, then I attached above each of the windows using Fast Grab Tacky glue. 






The valences inside just show at the top of the windows.



And the exterior awnings. Look Ma! No hands or bracing!




Oh, and here is the Lexan installed in the roof.



I had to make a final decision on how the front of the shop would not fall over. #$%& Gravity! The blue tape just doesn't complement the aesthetic I'm trying for here! Not being able to find my pack of magnets was all I needed to push me in the direction of option two: Having a lip on the ceiling piece to keep the front in place. But that had me thinking about what kind of things were going to be in front of the wall, as in landscaping. In order to get a good visual on that, I had to decide on and make the landscape board. I just happened to have some 12" x 24" x 1/4" birch plywood. Since I decided on a base of 13-1/2" x 18", I simply had to cut down my piece of plywood and laminate a 1-1/2" strip to it. No matter what I put in front of the front wall, as long as I leave a space for it to slide to the right for removal (which won't be often), I'll be okay.



The next goal I wanted to achieve for the week was to get the lighting completed. I went through my stash of lights and found some I thought could work. There will be a total of 7 interior lights, 2 exterior lights by the front door, and space to add at least two additional landscape lights. These were all purchased for other projects back in the days when I did not plan my spaces so well. Lucky for me, now I have them to use in the shop! Somebody up there has my back!


Shiny gold fixtures just weren't going to do, so using two coats of burnt sienna, a glaze/real brown pouncing, then another burnt sienna/glaze pouncing I made them rusty.

Great way to hold drying light fixtures.


I had to find a way to run the wiring for the chandelier, A beam seemed like the obvious choice for a structure with a clear ceiling. I used some leftover channel molding to run the wire through to the right side wall, then capped it off with a piece of 1/16" trim. To accommodate the chandelier's ceiling cap, I laminated 3 round Woodsies to each other (for thickness), cut them in half, then added a half to each side of the beam. To balance the feeling in the store, I added sister beams on either side with support beams attached to the walls underneath.



I thought it might be fun to add the sconces to Deb's favorite wall shelves (how adorable is her half scale garden!!!). That meant I had to stop and make up some leafy plants to fill them. Hello 1:00 AM! Can somebody please explain to Woodson that when you go to bed at 1:00 AM you get to sleep until 9:00 AM? Not 6:22 AM!!!




The next challenge was: How To Conceal The Wiring Coming Out The Side Of The Shop? The answer: More channel molding done in a way that looks intentional. I may add produce posters to the upper boxed frames.



And how about the wiring coming from the front exterior lights? To keep the ceiling/roof/top removable, these have to be attached to the ceiling/roof/top and be unplugged from the power strip as needed. Another channel for wires, this time with stripwood.


And what does all this look like from the back? Additional "Final Tidying" is on "The List". Kind of looks like a spooky tree. Hey! There's an idea!


And after all this work, do they work?









Yeah!!! They Work!!!

And I hope everything is working right for all of you, too!

xo xo,
Jodi

42 comments:

  1. Windows, shelving, hinges, awnings, lighting – what a week you’ve had! Autumn’s Pantry is looking really good. Thanks so much for including your thought process, materials and techniques.

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    1. Thanks Sherrill! I am really excited to get going on the plants and flowers next week! They always add so much life and color!

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  2. Increíble trabajo!!! Has trabajado mucho esta semana,tus ajustes,medidas y montaje han sido de una precisión absoluta y el resultado perfecto.
    Me encantan las vidrieras,le aportan mucho interés a los ventanales. y la iluminación te ha quedado genial,añadir plantas en los aplique es una gran idea!
    Que bonitos te han quedado los toldos contrastando con el color principal!
    Me gusta mucho como trabajas!!!
    Besos.

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    1. Gracias pilar! ¡Es muy agradable trabajar en un proyecto más pequeño porque los problemas y las tareas pendientes se resuelven mucho más rápido! ¡Tengo muchas ganas de la próxima semana cuando pueda comenzar las flores y plantas!

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  3. a precise job and a fantastic result! I like the colors, the structure and the light brings warmth to the whole.

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  4. I love the way the shop is turning out. Thanks for explaining how you hid the wiring.
    Marilyn

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    1. Thanks Marilyn! Hiding the wiring in a cohesive way is always a big challenge!

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  5. Love this! And I love long blogs with lots of pix and explanations. I feel as if I'm there with you. I just got a Cricut. I like to see what others do with it. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks Pat! There is a group on FaceBook that I just joined that does all kinds of really creative stuff for minis using their Cricuts. It may be a really helpful group for you:
      https://www.facebook.com/groups/MMBCS/about/

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  6. I love the ideas you come up with and watching them materialise but I also love how precise and utterly thought out your actual hands on work is. Such attention to detail sings to my pernickety soul. This is another lovely project and can just imagine the amount of mini glory you have yet to add.

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    1. Thank you Marilyn! After working on the New Orleans with all it's challenges, this little shop's demands seem delightful! I am glad the solutions appeal to the perfectionist in you! I have to say that working in the "rustic" genre does calm down my persnickety voices, too! I hope I have enough stuff or can come up with enough stuff to make to fill the shelves and crevices the way I imagine!

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  7. Excellent Work Jodi!!!
    I admire the way you've worked out your lighting plan, aged the fixtures and then installed them in such a way to make the wiring virtually SEAMLESS!
    The overhead beams ADD to the general ambience and make it feel even more Autumny- like tree branches stretched overhead to catch the sun!
    Love the scalloped awnings and the clear windows on top.
    It was a good call to modify your original plans regarding the stained glass, as the clear panes not only allow you to easily see the tops of the shelves but also give the feeling of even more openness inside the shop.

    Everything is LOOKING REALLY GOOD!

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    1. Thanks Elizabeth! I am so grateful that the lighting solutions seemed to be inspired! I'll take all the help I can get! I was a little sad to lose the idea of the stained glass windows to begin with, but now I believe I was being nudged in that decision, too! It's great to sit back and enjoy the process knowing those guiding you are smarter than you can perceive! It's going to be fun, wherever they lead us to next!

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  8. Wow, Jodi, you did get a lot done! I don't mind long posts at all, especially when you're explaining how you did things. They always provide inspiration and assistance for future projects. I absolutely love the way your awnings turned out, and the shelf inside the window is the perfect touch. I also like the way you antiqued the lights. (And by the way, I've ordered a couple of those wonderful planters from Alpha Stamps. 😊) I like them with the lighting inside. This will be a wonderful bright, warm and inviting store!

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    1. Thanks Deb! I'm so glad you found it interesting and helpful! I forget if you have a Cricut yet or not, but if you do, I am happy to share the files. I am so glad you ordered the planters, too, and can't wait to see what creative thing you do with them!

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  9. I can only agree with you on the term "productive" - wow, you've achieved so much in the meantime! As always it was big fun to follow your progress and even more the process. A good decision to let go the colorful stained glass, at the photo it looked like a case of "much too much", I suppose it would have been a deflection for the things you're going to display. And those shelves in the bay window as well as the beams are a stroke of genius, it adds so much to the atmosphere of the shop… and was of course a clever solution for your issues. Bravo for being so courageous to face your old nemesis, the hinges - no more need to be afraid of them anymore. Now you can join Betsy's club of "Hinges Lovers Worldwide"! *LOL* And it was once more amazing what you and your cricut can do, the awnings look wonderful. And of course let's not forget the lighting, this looks beautiful. Placing the lights into the boxes was a great idea. I only wonder now about the quality of this… once taken out of the package they start to rust... tsssss... ;O) But without kidding, a great choice to make them rusty, this is perfect for this awesome shop.

    Hugs
    Birgit

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    1. Thank you, Birgit! I am so glad you like the decisions to nix the stained glass and add shelves and beams! Sometimes the best ideas just pop into your head from nowhere! I am still pinching myself on those hinges! Was it just a dream that they went so well? I suspect that the next time I encounter hinges, my old fears will still dog me, but maybe I'll be just a little less afraid to try! It is incredible the things that some miniaturists do with their Cricuts! Joining that FB group has really opened my eyes to a lot more potential! I am glad you like the awnings!
      It's funny about the lights rusting right out of the package - I have a kit that is supposed to actually rust stuff with a chemical reaction! I am going to have to drag it out and have a play with it one day!

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  10. Busy, busy, busy! Not only a great post but one filled with little nuggets of good ideas that will be stashed away. One in particular - channelled moulding! I have a need for some of that soon. I like this, a lot!

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    1. Thank you Irene! I am so happy that you found it interesting and can take a potential solution away with you! Just being a part of this amazing community means we all advance in leaps and bounds and find inspiration everywhere!!

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  11. Awesome! So much to learn from you. I love the transparent ceiling. It inspires me to make a similar one for my unfinished styrofoam flower shop. You've accomplished with great success an enormous lot of fantastic work.
    Hugs, Drora

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    1. Thank you Drora! I am so happy that you found an idea to take away with you! I think a clear ceiling in the flower shop will be fantastic! I'm sending prayers that you will soon find a little time to lose yourself in the project and have a little fun!

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  12. Wow! You've gotten so much done! I love how it looks! The only thing that's throwing me off is the sides of the awnings being open. I love the colors and patterns though. Beautiful contrast with the green.

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    1. Thanks Sheila! Yeah it was a productive week! Late nights but when things are going well you just don't want to stop!
      I may have gone with a closed awning look if I could have found a pattern. I'm kind of glad it worked out though, because open awnings are really common and allow you to see into the windows better. They would have been much more complicated to fold and mount, as well. I only had two sheets left of each pattern, so I am relieved that the last try worked!

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  13. Un trabajo espectacular. Me encanta todo lo que as hecho hasta ahora

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    1. Gracias isabel ¡Espero que sigas y sigas disfrutando de las ideas!

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  14. Wow you got a lot done. I love what you did to the lights they look perfect in the shop. The awning looks amazing and is very cheerful. I love the shelf in the bay window it will look great with items on it.Thanks for all the wonderful tips. Fantastic job.
    Hugs Maria

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    1. Thanks Maria! I am so happy that everything I am doing here appeals to you, too! Hopefully, the accessories will add to the character!

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  15. Wow! Jodi, you are on a Roll!!! I am late to get here, and it is getting late, but Wow! You have worked Wonders with this little kit! I am storing up info and techniques to try someday! The lights look awesome! The channel molding for the wires is a great trick! The posters on those boxes are so cute! I am loving every thing you add and can't wait to see more!!! :):):)

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    1. Thank you Betsy! I am happy that you like where this project is leading me! It's exciting and fun to get lost into something that just seems to build itself! :O)

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  16. Hello Jodi, for some reason my comment on your last post did not get posted. I love the bold colours of this shop. The green and orange of tge furniture, the stone countertop. And the browns, creams and rust of the fixtures and fittings. Stunning. I look forwardvto the next episode.

    Huibrecht

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    1. Hi Huibrecht! So sorry about the trouble with posting comments! I periodically experience that too, usually when I have given extremely insightful and poignant sentiments! Thank you for trying again, and I am so happy that you like the direction this little shop is dragging me! :O)

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  17. Ooooh those lights what a brilliant idea most of the lamps you can buy are so shiny gold or silver I love the rusty look!!!
    have a nice day,
    groetjes van Marijke

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    1. Thanks Marijke! I hope you find the opportunity to try turning those gold and silver fixtures into something rustic one day! It's great fun to see them transform!

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  18. Hi jodi Wow, fabulous project. I love the way you explain each step. It is a wonderful work and full of details. The colors are beautiful. Thank you for sharing your ideas and knowledge! I want to see the next part.

    Amary

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    1. Thanks Amary! I am so happy to hear that the colors appeal to you and that you are getting something from my long winded posts! I learn so much from this amazing community and am happy to share my experiences, too!

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  19. Esta quedando genial.
    Que ganas de verla terminada con todos sus detalles.
    Un saludo

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    1. Gracias marian! ¡Espero que te guste la decoración cuando la tenga todo decorado!

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  20. Hi, Jodi - Autumn's Pantry is turning out beautifully! The windows look flawless, and I was delighted to learn about the Lexan; I will definitely use that material at the next opportunity. I think the window display shelf was the perfect choice - how lovely that will be from the outside looking in! You've also done such nice work on the door and the hinges, and the inviting door color just makes me want to open it wide and walk right into the Pantry. I love all the light fixtures that you've painted; the rusty color is just right - and I especially like the wall sconces with greenery that you created! My very favorite things about the Pantry so far, though, are the dual-pattern awnings and valances. What a clever idea - and your workmanship on this complex job is impeccable. This little shop is amazing for its detail and use of the space, and I know that it will become more amazing as you continue - that's exciting!
    Marjorie

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    1. Hi Marjorie and Thank You! I am glad that you have found out about and are planning to try the Lexan! I think you will enjoy working with it more as opposed to the thinner acetate! It's great to have all the basic stuff done on the shop now and I am able to concentrate on the myriad other fun things that will go inside!

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